Can Dogs Eat Carrots? – A vegetable your dog can eat

 Can Dogs Eat Carrots?   A vegetable your dog can eat

Most dogs love carrots, and they are great snacks for your pet. They are low calorie foods, and are generally safe to feed healthy dogs. Carrots may be raw or cooked, depending on your dog’s individual preference

How to Feed Your Dog Carrots

Dogs can eat cooked carrots. Dogs can eat uncooked carrots! Be prepared to clean up a mess because some dogs will just chew up carrots and leave bits all over the floor. Carrots are good for dogs’ teeth! Don’t feed too many carrots to your dog she might get sick.

Dogs love to eat, and play with raw carrots. They are perfectly healthy, and are often added to dog foods as filler.

Chewing on carrots helps decrease a dog’s anxiety levels, and prevents dogs from chewing on other things like your shoes carpets and furniture.

There are so many health benefits of carrots to humans and dogs alike. Your dog will not be consuming carrots of the same amount as you (of course) but they will be getting some of the same benefits.

Benefits of Carrots for Dogs

1. Improved Vision
Western culture’s understanding of carrots being “good for the eyes” is one of the few we got right. Carrots are rich in beta-carotene, which is converted into vitamin A in the liver. Vitamin A is transformed in the retina, to rhodopsin, a purple pigment necessary for night vision.

Beta-carotene has also been shown to protect against macular degeneration and senile cataracts. A study found that people who eat the most beta-carotene had 40 percent lower risk of macular degeneration than those who consumed little.

2. Cancer Prevention
Studies have shown carrots reduce the risk of lung cancer, breast cancer and colon cancer. Researchers have just discovered falcarinol and falcarindiol which they feel cause the anticancer properties.

Falcarinol is a natural pesticide produced by the carrot that protects its roots from fungal diseases. Carrots are one of the only common sources of this compound. A study showed 1/3 lower cancer risk by carrot-eating mice.

3. Anti-Aging
The high level of beta-carotene acts as an antioxidant to cell damage done to the body through regular metabolism. It help slows down the aging of cells.

PugSlopeEatingCarrot 500x378 Can Dogs Eat Carrots?   A vegetable your dog can eat

Picture courtesy of Pugslope

Carrots can protect your dog’s coat from the inside! Vitamin A and antioxidants protects the dog’s coat and keep it shiny! Deficiencies of vitamin A cause dryness to the skin, hair and nails. Vitamin A prevents premature wrinkling, acne, dry skin, pigmentation, blemishes, and uneven skin tone.

Carrots are known by herbalists to prevent infection. They can be used on cuts – shredded raw or boiled and mashed.

Studies show that diets high in carotenoids are associated with a lower risk of heart disease. Carrots have not only beta-carotene but also alpha-carotene and lutein.

The regular consumption of carrots also reduces cholesterol levels because the soluble fibers in carrots bind with bile acids.

Vitamin A in carrots assists the liver in flushing out the toxins from the dog’s body. It reduces the bile and fat in the liver. The fibers present in carrots help clean out the colon and hasten waste movement.

It’s all in the crunch! Carrots clean your dog’s teeth and mouth. They scrape off plaque and food particles just like toothbrushes or toothpaste. Carrots stimulate gums and trigger a lot of saliva, which being alkaline, balances out the acid-forming, cavity-forming bacteria. The minerals in carrots prevent tooth damage.

ArlissThePugEating Carrot Can Dogs Eat Carrots?   A vegetable your dog can eat

Arliss the Pug loves carrots!

From all the above benefits it is no surprise that in a Harvard University study, people who ate more than six carrots a week are less likely to suffer a stroke than those who ate only one carrot a month or less. Again, your dog will not be eating the same amount of carrots as you but a carrot a day, can be said to keep their hearts healthy!

Comments

  1. says

    Woof! Woof! I LOVE carrots and eat them regularly as a snack. Mom made me a cookie too with carrots. LOVE your carrot hat. Lots of Golden Woofs, Sugar
    FYI: Don’t forget to add this post/url to the Tasty Tuesday 2/12 blog hop. Golden Woofs

  2. says

    Bunk, you’ve touched on something near and dear to my heart.

    Yes, I’m an admitted carrot-FREAK! As you can see in that photo of me – the rest of the world fades when a carrot is in front of me.

    I’m so glad us dogs can eat them – otherwise I don’t know if I survive!

    -Love,
    Sid.

    • Bunk says

      AWW Sid! We really did not know which pictures of you to choose. You ARE so into carrots and so amazingly cute while eating them too!:)

  3. Carmen says

    The info provided in your website is great help. Thank you very much. I read 10 of your articles. I did not see one in Okra. Here you have one that I gave to my English bulldog for a leg arthritis problem. She was cured from that with a soup made with okra and cow feet bullion cubes. (Also, massage with a good cream, I used Dermolan but from Costa Rica, which exist in USA, but may be different purpose and content) you can use any massage cream for dogs.
    The cow feet is precook and frozen to take grease out and then made in ice cubes to add 2/3 per portion of soup.
    My recipe: 4 cut okras (not blended), one small carrot, a stalk of cut celery blended in a cup of water and 3 cubes of cow feet bullion. All of that cook in and 2 cups of water for 5 minutes. Then added to the half of regular dog food. I used Wellness blue dark packaged which does not contain canola oil. This info will help you to avoid expensive leg surgeries for our pets. Love and care from Carmen.

    • Jingles says

      I love carrots! My owners feed me apples, bananas, watermelon and much more fruit and veg (Again)! My family decided that on Movie Night, (Friday night), they will give me and sandwich (Not to much bread!) with carrots, apples, bananas and 2 spreads of peanut butter. Love and Licks, Jingles. xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

  4. Elsie says

    Thank you for all the great info on carrots, it confirms my intuition that they are good. I regularly put one grated carrot per feed in my dog’s daily meal mixed with fresh meat, chicken neck, canned meat and kibble. How much is “too much”? Will a carrot a day keep the vet away?

  5. says

    My dog LOVES carrots. I don’t give him those chew sticks/rawhide anymore as they scare me… He would swallow pieces whole if frightened. I slice the carrots down the middle about 4 times depending on size. They’re thin enough so he doesn’t choke and long enough to where he can carry them though the house as a treat. He loves them and I know they’e safe and healthy! Rawhide and packaged treats from China are so unhealthy and bad for them…

  6. Dilys says

    Thanks for your invaluable information on carrots, my dog, an elderly Pomeranian has been on cortisone for about three months, he is always very hungry which is a side effect of cortisone, he started putting on weight and was very lethargic. I decided to give him raw carrot when he barked for food between meals. since having the carrot he has lost weight is more active, and a very happy little dog.

  7. Jerry Feldman says

    didn’t know the value of carrots for dogs. I give mine his kibbles, boiled skinless boneless chicken breasts, green beans and low fat cottage cheese. I will now use carrots as a treat.

  8. Sandra Harper says

    For many years I have chopped up carrots and steamed them for a treat for my dogs. I have a Pug and he has had several incidents of kidney stones and bladder infections. My vet says that there is a chemical in carrots that can cause this. Do you have information that you can share about this? I have had over ten dogs through out my lifetime that lived to ripe old ages. This Precious Pug is the only one that has had problems from “so called” carrots.

  9. Mardi Palmer says

    Good information, thanks. My 7 year old Golden Retriever is on a weight loss regime and I’m trying to “fill” his 1 cup morning and 1 cup evening food with something – he actually liked the cooked carrot I put in last night. He won’t touch them raw though.

  10. lewis powell says

    i feed my spriner spanial every day i cut them up into 1 inch pieces and throw them 1 one at time and he loves chasing them down the garden THANK FOR PUTTING MY MIND AT REST

  11. ROBBI v says

    I can not even chop baby carrot or eat them without my Giggles showing up for her share.

    Glad to hear of all the benefits.

  12. Bonnie says

    My Maltese could stand to lose a small amount of weight so I have started replacing her treats with carrots. I slice a very thin medallion to give her every time she’s a “good girl” outside. I did read about the baby-cut or petite carrots being soaked in chlorine so I only slice from full sized carrots. Thanks for the information.

  13. Dick says

    I just gave our dog about 4 of the mini carrots you can pick up prepackaged. He love them. I’m glad they are good for him. I cut them up about the size of a dime. There is a better smell to him when they are taken directly out of the bag and I give him a smell. He likes small pieces and I feel much better letting him have these than the other junk that comes in a big. I do not give him table scraps or any raw hide products. I do love the brand CHEW LOTTA for some treats.

  14. bets wald says

    Cooked carrots make my dog sick EVERY time.
    He has no problem with raw carrots and loves them.

  15. kim kurz says

    I have always let my dogs snack on raw carrot. I have recently learned that dogs can’t metabolize carrots and other raw veggies because of the cellulose and they must be cooked to get the nutrition element from them. I still give them the occasional raw carrots for teeth cleaning and chewing but they also have a high sugar context and I was told by one vet when my dogs had cancer that sugar feeds cancer so not too many carrots. Check on the carrot info yourself like I did.

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