Eggs

Potential Risks of Dogs Eating Eggs

Egg whites cause Biotin deficiency – Egg whites contain avidin, a Biotin (one of the B vitamins) inhibitor. Biotin is one of the B vitamins and is important for cellular growth, fatty acid metabolism and good skin and coat. Biotin deficiencies are quite rare and it would take an extraordinary amount of eggs to create a deficiency. Moreover, egg yolks are very high in biotin, so as long as you feed the entire egg, there are few worries. There are other sources of biotin in the diet as well. Liver is a particularly good source. Once again, cooking the egg white will eliminate the risk but your dog will lose much of the nutritional value. If feeding your dog eggs on a regular basis, simply make sure he gets the whole egg, not just the white.

Egg2 500x332 Eggs

Eggs contain salmonella – Dogs are well equipped to handle the bacteria in raw foods. The health of the hen is also important, so it is best to choose eggs from organic, free-range chickens. Proper storage and keeping the eggs cool will also go a long way toward keeping the harmful bacteria at a manageable level.

Don’t forget the shells – If eggs are fed with the shell on, they are a nearly complete food source for dogs. The shells can also be valuable for dogs who have difficulty eating bones. Simply dry the shells out and grind them in a clean coffee grinder until they are powdered and sprinkle the powder on your dog’s food. It’s important to remember that many eggs are sprayed with a chemical to make them look shiny, so it is best to get your eggs from a local organic farmer.

And although research does not point to eggshells as a source of salmonella poisoning in cats and dogs, if it is a concern, you can boil the shells first — allowing them to dry thoroughly — and then crush the shells in a coffee grinder, food processor, or with a mortar and pestle.

This crushing method also makes it easier to store the shell’s pieces in bulk, rather than perform the task daily, since there will be need to worry about the shell being damp and prone to mold. The crushed shell can then be stored in an airtight bowl or jar for the week.

Again, if you are at all concerned about your pet’s ability to handle a whole unbroken egg, you can tap the egg against a counter top, tapping the egg on all sides until the shell is cracked all over. Then your dog or cat will be able to bite right into the egg, shell and all.

Eggs are cheap, easily obtained and an outstanding source of nutrition for your dog. The overall concensus with raw feeders is that the health benefits of eggs certainly outweigh the risks – and feeding eggs whole, the way nature intended, goes a long ways to counteract harmful imbalances. Try feeding your dogs a few eggs a week and he will you’ll see better health, inside and out.

In conclusion, dogs can eat eggs, whether they be raw or boiled. It is advisable to feed your dog a couple of eggs a week to keep them healthy!

Comments

  1. Wongjan says

    I love this site it helps me know what kinds I should give to my dog and not so for me it’s a 5 star site

    • jay says

      I have an APBT, a 3 month old pup. Been feeding it halfway cooked eggs for 3 weeks and is the happiest and healthiest looking dog. No signs of GI problems. Her coat is amazing.

      • Jack says

        I feed my 2 pit mix dogs 5 eggs each twice a day for over a year no problems. Cooked over easy just the way I like them and they love it. They save their kibble for last. Also good for me is $3 per day cost for 20 eggs.
        Dog food industry is 4 billion per year, they have a vested interest in pushing you away from anything other then processed dog feed. I also cooked them chicken breast with bones for over 3 years never any problem. The only problem I ever had was when my dog got a beef rib bone stuck on her teeth. I pulled it out out. It was stuck good, but she is obsessive about chewing on bones

  2. FP says

    One of my dogs vets said to NEVER give dogs raw eggs. They must be cooked. I have a 10 pound dog and he said it’s okay to feed her 1 cooked egg per day. It has a lot of omegas in them and helpful to keep her joints healthy.

    • FP says

      PS…. organic properly raised and fed chicken eggs. Not this pesticide crap eggs that are terribly unhealthy for all beings.

    • TR says

      my breeder recommended giving eggs (hard boiled or Raw to our puppies) they had terrible diarrhea for days) we realized it was the eggs were a big factor. They just can’t digest it properly, though some pets get bad gas, as the article mentions , is that a good thing or is there a reaction to the eggs (mild or not).

    • de says

      My one dog cannot deal with raw egg as it causes very loose stool. She is also not so find of egg andvi have to mix in somethind tasty for her to finish it. Other completly fine with raw. I do lightly cook for one and don’t give raw whites.

    • Bunk says

      How much did he eat? We feed Bunk eggs all of the time, but in small amounts. Can you please provide more details? We would really like to know so that we can alter our post accordingly.

      • TR says

        We have 9 good sized Doberman puppies, They had three hard boiled eggs smashed into their respective dog bowls (one egg for each three dogs) they ALL got sick as mentioned in my previous posting. We figured it was low quality dog food given by our breeder initially, changed their dog food to Orijen but kept the eggs, all dogs still sick, then When the eggs stopped, stool returned to normal. They are all happy and healthy, no bloated bellies and terrible diarrhea as before!

  3. Diego says

    Just like people are different and tolerate diets in different ways, so are dogs. Eggs are ok if they suit your dog, but avoid any kind of excess. Raw eggs are not bad, only if they have disease…but its not the actual egg. With todays industrialized food where much disease abounds, it is better to cook the egg. Avoid too much oil, better boil it. What does affect dogs are severe changes in diet, so add any changes in small percentage to their usual diet. I really recommend to add cooked carrot, peas, etc. to their diet; dogs can digest vegetables and love them.

  4. joey says

    hi there, i been feeding my dog yolk only, will it have any effects? after she ate, she vomit it out after few hours. Is a min pin. please advice. thx

    • Bunk says

      I would talk to your vet about it, but I would recommend that you stop feeding your dog anything that causes vomiting.

  5. J says

    I feed my dog raw egg every morning. I wash it before I put it in his bowl just in case there is something there. He loves eating egg and always saves it to last. Its like an edible toy for him. Sometimes he’ll eat a part of the shell too.

    • jane says

      hi…hey look, try cooking the egg for him…a quick scramble…if you have a little grated cheddar throw it in…i betcha it will be the FIRST thing he eats…i don’t think dogs wait
      for the best thing last…:)…just an experiment…try it out. …:)

  6. says

    I read this and it says that dogs cannot have raw egg whites and neither should they have the raw shells as they are hard to digest???

    Avidin is a glycoprotein found in raw egg white. It combines stoichiometrically with biotin. The toxic effect of uncooked egg white which causes a syndrome similar to that of vitamin B deficiency (Boaz 1924) led to the discovery of the vitamin biotin (Gyorgy 1931, 1939). The toxic factor, first isolated by Eakin et al. (1940, 1941) who named it avidin, combines with the essential growth factor resulting in a “non-digestible” avidin-biotin complex which is not absorbed from the intestine or from the surrounding medium by microorganisms. Avidin plays an important role in biotin function studies and in the study of several enzymes in which biotin is a coenzyme. Avidin or avidin subunits bound to a matrix have been utilized for affinity purification (Berger and Wood, 1975; Green and Toms, 1973).

    VERY hard to work out who is right and wrong with these diets for animals…..

    • Bunk says

      Well, people have different viewpoints. We feel our dog eggs (left-overs mostly because he’s tiny) all the time and he’s completely fine.

      • TR says

        I am not sure it’s worth the gamble. Some folks smoke and never get cancer….A person can live on eggs and twinkies but that doesn’t mean it is really good for one’s health. A car can run on cheap gas but should you do it if you want long use of the car? I’m thinking no. Having had a bad experience it’s just not worth it for the clean up or the general health of the dog over all IMVHO.

  7. My Girl says

    Well, I have 3 organic free ranging hens and they have their nest they made for themselves in a secluded area. My little Min Pin loves raw eggs and when the hens are not on the nest and I have not seen an egg she will help herself to any eggs there may be. She has the most beautiful coat, very shiny all over but I have to admit I am going to have to make an off the ground nest for the hens as she is picking up weight eating all the eggs :p. She is a small girl and it’s amazing to see how she can carry an egg (they are much bigger than shop eggs) in her mouth (only on the pointy side of the egg) sit down, gently pierce the shell in a circle around the egg, open it and then eat it. She also eats the whole shell when she has finished with the insides.

    She has never been sick from any eggs.

  8. mary charlton says

    Bubba& Monty.
    I have fed my tiny Cavapoo and my not so tiny Golden Retriever pups scrambled egg in small amounts from 8 weeks..
    they suffered a bout of severe Diarrhea at 20 and 10 weeks respectively.. vet blamed the eggs… stopped feeding eggs
    stool returned to normal then a week later Diarrhea returned …on investigation it turned out a well meaning but uninformed
    neighbor was throwing chocolate biscuits over the six foot wall that borders my yard.. The eggs have now been reintroduced
    with no side effects.. except for Montys rather smelly emissions I have also put a note on my gate asking that food not be tossed over the gate and moved the fence back so that food thrown over wall cannot reach my dogs…So I think the benefits outweigh the possible side effects..the dogs coats are shiny and healthy looking and they are fit and very healthy dogs …Mary

  9. Logan says

    I have a 6 year old bulldog with some skin skin allergies. I started feeding him 1 raw egg every morning and noticed a massive change in his health( for the better). Not only did his skin condition start to clear up, i was able to cut back on his medication, hes not scratching or chewing himself anymore and he has more energy than he has had in the last couple years. If your dog can stomach eggs I would recommend it.

  10. says

    I have been feeding eggs to my dogs for years. I have been eating the same eggs for years too. We have not had any problems and love the eggs. For the dogs, I put the raw eggs in their bowl, pour an equal volume of hot milk on them so that they get mildly cooked and give it to them immediately.

  11. Barry Lalanne says

    I feed my puppy one boiled egg (when cooked) with his evening meal. He loves it and his stool is normal. I wouldn’t give him a raw egg though…

  12. Chloé the podenco says

    I try to feed 2 or 3 eggs max à week … Same as for me health wise.
    Shes never had soft or running stools. i feed them raw if just purchased .

  13. Joani Samuels says

    I give my four basset hounds eggs laid by my silkie bantam hens. They wait for me to collect them and carry them in their mouths, piercing the shell with their teeth, licking out the inside and then eat most of the shell. They love them and are very healthy dogs. No problem with eating eggs.

  14. Cayla says

    I scramble eggs with coconut oil for my 10 month old german shepherd and he loves it!! The eggs also cook really well in the coconut oil. He has a very sensitive GI tract, but eggs seem to work well with his digestive system.

  15. melina says

    I have a 4 month old norfolk retriver is a boiled egg daily fine for her. Things are kinda expensive here in Pakistan. I try my best be it leaving my own share for her (as long as its dog friendly food)

  16. Colleen says

    I have 3 dogs ranging in size from a very small Yorkie to mid size Coonhound and a large yellow lab. All of them eat eggs raw everyday it is a complete protein of course with the shell. You should not give them just the white or just the yellow together is the only way for them to get the benefits with out the adverse reaction of the Biotin . This is how nature or God intended for animals to live.

  17. d.taylor says

    I have a 2 year old American Bulldog & a 3 month old Pitt. They both get scrambled eggs every morning. Both of there coats look great & my American Bulldog quit scratching after we started the eggs.

  18. Bill says

    I have a 9 mo. old Dogo Argentino. He loves raw eggs, shell and all. I also mix raw hamburger in with his dry kibble daily. He’ll pick out the burger and leave most of the kibble until later, but if an egg was mixed into the batch………it’s all gone right now! I also give him a daily tablespoon of organic coconut oil and his skin and coat are beautiful. (No gas, loose stools or digestive issues either)

    • Eric Ruvalcaba says

      Hello Bill,

      We also have a Dogo Argentino puppy and feed her boiled eggs without the shell several times a week. Her coat is very shinny and notice her farts are a little bit more stinky. Do you know of the other benefits eggs have for Dogos? Should we include the shell as part of her treat?

      Thank you!

  19. jeromy says

    I feed my dogs egss all the time no problem. One of my dogs even eats the poo from the other ones. So it gets double eggs. Never gets sick.

  20. Jordan says

    I gave both my dogs cooked eggs once and it made them both throw up. At the time I didn’t realize it was the eggs. But a few weeks later I gave one of them eggs and it made her throw up again. So I don’t give them eggs anymore.

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