Pineapple

Can Dogs Eat Pineapple?

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Yes, dogs can eat pineapples. It is also recommended for our fellow canine friends who have an interest in eating their own poop. Apparently, the pineapple is said to help with that.

It is important to keep in mind that pineapple is not a recommended food for dogs by veterinarians. I would not make a habit out of it. You may be wondering if pineapple is not fatal for dogs and the dogs can eat them, why is it that they are not recommended? Please keep reading to find the answer to your question.

Precautions When Feeding Your Dog Pineapple

Dogs can have different reactions to the same food. This is why it is always good to proceed with caution. I am sure you have heard stories of people who have fed their twenty-year-old dog ten slices of pineapple for all the twenty years and their dog has been very healthy. I don’t doubt these people and I am sure this is true. However, just because it is true for someone else does not mean it is going to be true for your dog.

Some dogs may react differently and the pineapple may cause diarrhea because of the high sugar content but that is just as far as it goes. The upsets are not in anyway life threatening and if your dog will not like it, it will show you in future. When the pineapple is digested, it develops a taste that puts the dogs off according to most vets and this will basically refrain it from eating its own poop if it has made it a habit. Make sure you consult with a vet for more information to find out if your dog in particular, may react differently.

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How Much Pineapple You Should Feed Your Dog

Small amount of pineapples can be good for dogs. By small, I mean feeding it to your dog as a mini treat. You can cut the pineapple into little chunks (smaller than the ones that are in the canned pineapples) and use them as training treats or even as a snack! Most dogs seem to like them. Also, pineapple is good for a dog’s digestion. Pineapple contains a protein that helps dogs digest protein.

Pineapples are very popular amongst the humans. This is why, Pineapples have exceptional juiciness and a vibrant tropical flavor that balances the tastes of sweet and tart. They are second only to bananas as America’s favorite tropical fruit. Although the season for pineapple runs from March through June, they are available year-round in local markets.

Pineapples are a composite of many flowers whose individual fruitlets fuse together around a central core. An “eye,” the rough spiny marking on the pineapple’s surface, can identify each fruitlet. Pineapples have a wide cylindrical shape, a scaly green, brown or yellow skin and a regal crown of spiny, blue-green leaves and fibrous yellow flesh. The area closer to the base of the fruit has more sugar content and therefore a sweeter taste and more tender texture.

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Keep in mind though that the seeds of most fruits contain cyanide, which is poisonous to dogs as well as humans.

Always remove seeds from fruit before giving them to your dog to be safe. Too much fruit can give your dog a stomachache or diarrhea.

Comments

  1. Wendy Yffert says

    I have a very tiny male Yorkshire Terrier that has been diagnosed with a mild liver shunt.
    he was having these episodes, he had 2 about a week apart. He would get terribly lethargic and at some time loose coordination and could not stand up. He would also shake and have trouble even lifting head off my lap.
    my husband and I thought he had gotten into something that was not good for him ie: a dropped pill or something like a spider bite. we took him to the veterinarian both times the first time they gave him some charcoal and checked him and said he seems to be stable so take him home and keep an eye on him and I later that evening he was getting active again and then went to bed early find the next day this second episode wasn’t his to be there as the first one that I caused it that right away brought him down they did some blood work and everything worked out okay cuz she recommended they do a special blood test to check for the liver shunt.
    sure enough for this test showed he has a mild liver shunt. Which his body cant process his food properly and it builds up and the toxins in his body cause him to act drugged. We started him on 2 meds 1 flagyl for 30 days .2mm twice daily
    and 2nd Lactose .1mms twice a day.
    we need to limit his protien intake also.
    so far he has not had a serious episode. Just a couple times did face rubbing, digging in couch and sleeps alot his eyes get a little glossy distant looking.
    my equation is is there anything special besides what we are doing that Would be benificial to his health.
    he is a very tiny boy at 2.5lbs.
    my husband and I really are so in love with him we want him to live a long health live without permanent liver damage!!
    Any suggestions
    Thank you
    Wendy Yffert

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